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  1. The United States government has advised its citizens to reconsider travel to Nigeria as a result of the security threats in some parts of the country. In its latest travel advisory, the government decried the spate of crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and maritime crime, stressing that some areas have increased risk. “Violent crime – such as armed robbery, assault, carjacking, kidnapping, hostage-taking, banditry, and rape – is common throughout the country. Read Also: Politicians Are Sponsors Of Banditry, Says Uzodinma “Kidnappings for ransom occur frequently, often targeting dual national citizens who have returned to Nigeria for a visit, as well as U.S. citizens with perceived wealth. Kidnapping gangs have also stopped victims on interstate roads,” the U.S. government said. It was worried that terrorists have continued to plot and carry out attacks in Nigeria, especially in the North East. According to the government, terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting shopping centres, malls, markets, hotels, places of worship, restaurants, bars, schools, government installations, transportation hubs, and other places where crowds gather.
  2. It is by now evident that although President Joe Biden appreciates and identifies with Nigerians (certainly in more ways than Donald Trump did), he has nothing but stone-cold disdain for the inert, isolated mannequin in Aso Rock that pretends to be Nigeria’s “president.” Biden’s first call to an African president (on March 3) after his inauguration wasn’t to the president of the continent’s most populous country; it was to Kenya’s Uhuru Kenyatta. Even in the aftermath of his electoral triumph in November 2020, Biden also only called South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa. And on February 26, Vice President Kamala Harris spoke to President Felix Tshisekedi of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Nigeria’s geographic and demographic heft in the African continent hasn’t caused it to deserve the attention of America’s new leaders. Well, it has to be because Nigeria is now basically leaderless. Everyone who pays attention knows this. I am not surprised that Biden is giving Buhari the cold shoulder. Right from his campaign, Biden made it clear that he identifies with the frustrations Nigerians feel with the Buhari regime’s ineptitude and ruthlessness. For instance, while Trump and his campaign looked the other way when Buhari’s regime brutally suppressed and murdered peaceful #EndSARS protesters, Biden issued a statement in support of the protest and expressed horror at the unconscionable barbarities the regime inflicted on protesters. In an October 21, 2020 statement, he urged “President Buhari and the Nigerian military to cease the violent crackdown on protesters in Nigeria, which has already resulted in several deaths,” saying, “My heart goes out to all those who have lost a loved one in the violence. The United States must stand with Nigerians who are peacefully demonstrating for police reform and seeking an end to corruption in their democracy.” At no time in America’s history has any candidate for president shown this level of interest in the affairs of Nigeria. It was no surprise therefore that henchmen of the Buhari regime were deeply emotionally invested in Trump’s reelection and in Biden’s loss. As Wall Street Journal’s Africa Bureau Chief Joe Parkinson reported on November 8, 2020, honchos of the Buhari regime had desperately hoped for a Trump win in the 2020 presidential election. “Nigeria’s president was one of the first African leaders to congratulate Biden but privately, some of his key advisors were hoping for a Trump victory and are worried,” he wrote. “The reasons are quite simple and are linked — human rights, the #EndSARS protests, and weapon sales.” Parkinson concluded, correctly it’s turning out, that “President Biden may be much less welcoming to Buhari; much more skeptical about selling weapons to Nigeria’s military and much more forthright in criticising any crackdown on protests. That’s why, despite the tweets, some at the top of the Buhari administration are nervous.” But there’s another reason Buhari preferred a Trump presidency: Trump is an embodiment of— and an enabler of— moral putrefaction and a boon to blood-stained, anti-democratic despots all over the world. The Trump and Buhari regimes also share a lot in common. They both loathe the news media, chafe at the feeblest dissent, are nepotistic, are incompetent and derelict in their duties, are unapologetic in their allegiances to divisive primordial loyalties in their countries, and personify indecency and corruption of the darkest dye. Even if the Buhari regime murders every citizen of Nigeria, Trump wouldn’t care a whit. He doesn’t think Black people’s lives are worth saving and would probably be pleased that there are fewer Black people on earth since, in any case, he has singled out Nigeria as an example of a country he doesn’t want immigration from into the U.S. Notice, however, that while Biden obviously disdains Buhari and his regime, he has shown remarkable connection with everyday Nigerians. One of the first people he called after winning his election in November 2020 was a Nigerian immigrant family in Springfield, Illinois. The Nigerian-American he called to thank and invite to the White House for donating $12 to his presidential campaign has been identified as Dr. Francis Abiola Oke who came to the US in 2007 from Iseyin in northern Oyo State. Biden’s wide-ranging, 20-minute phone conversation with Dr. Oke and his two daughters was one of the sweetest, most genuine expressions of warmth I have seen from a politician in a long while. My own children derived so much vicarious joy from watching the video of the call. No American president-elect had ever gone out of his way to reach out to the Nigerian immigrant community in the United States like Biden did. Of course, we also know that Biden’s government has more Nigerian Americans serving in strategic positions than in any government in America’s history. He nominated Adewale Adeyemo as Deputy Treasury Secretary (equivalent to a minister of state for finance), Funmi Olorunnipa Badejo as Associate White House Counsel, and 26-year-old Osaremen Okolo as a member of the presidential COVID-19 response team. So, it’s apparent that Biden has a lot of respect for Nigerians and courts their talent. But, like every sensible person, he just can’t bring himself to respect a government that despises its people, that has given up every pretense to governance, that willfully fertilizes fissiparity in its polity, that looks away while its citizens swim daily in oceans of blood, and that has proved either incapable or disinclined to halt its country’s descent into the world’s kidnap capital. Biden’s symbolic repudiation of the Buhari regime is an acknowledgement that he knows what Nigerians know: that they have no president, that their country has gone to the dogs, that what passes for the “Nigerian presidency” is a disorganized cornucopia of little political fiefdoms that work at cross purposes, and that mindless corruption and insensate cruelty are the governing philosophies of the hordes of swashbucklers who stand in for an absent, insentient, and clueless “president” marooned in Aso Rock. Even Donald Trump, with whom Buhari shares many horrid qualities, reportedly called him a “lifeless” dolt with whom he never wanted to meet again. He was underwhelmed, irritated even, by Buhari’s child-like timidity and taciturnity when they met at the White House in April 2018. If even someone as objectionable and disreputable as Trump can find you unworthy of a second meeting—even after unwisely paying his government $496m upfront for fighter jets you aren’t sure will be delivered—you know there is something fundamentally defective about you. To be clear, a call from the US president is nothing more than a diplomatic nicety. It confers no special status on presidents who receive it and detracts nothing substantive from presidents who are shunned. America’s national interest will always dictate how it relates to every country, no matter who is president. Nonetheless, it bespeaks the international alienation and contempt that Buhari’s rulership has caused Nigeria that most of the world increasingly bypasses Nigeria for even symbolic gestures to the African continent. Most people in the world know that Nigeria’s current ruler, through his actions and inactions, has plunged the country to the nadir of despair. There are now two dominant emotions in Nigeria: resignation and suspended animation. People are either resigned to the possibility that the country is headed for an implosion or hope against hope that it will endure until 2023 when Buhari’s stolen tenure will end to have another chance at a rebirth. Anyone who burdens his country with this weight of hopelessness deserves to be shunned by all world leaders.
  3. Donald Trump Capitol Hill Riot: Former US President Donald Trump was has been cleared by the Senate of inciting the deadly riot at the US Capitol. Donald Trump Capitol Hill Riot: Former President cleared A two-thirds majority of the 100 senators was needed at Trump’s impeachment trial for conviction, but it fell short in a 57-43 vote. Seven Republicans joined Democrats in voting to convict. …Details Later!
  4. US President Joe Biden said former president, Donald Trump left him a "very generous letter" before leaving office. Speaking from behind the Resolute Desk, Biden said he would not reveal the contents of the letter out of respect for former President Donald Trump. "The President wrote a very generous letter," Biden said. "Because it was private I will not talk about it until I talk to him", the new President added.
  5. Nigerians living in America joined in yesterday celebrations of the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as President and Vice President. This Nigerian mom stunned many as she dazzled in an Aso Ebi made to celebrate the historic day. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were yesterday sworn-in as President and Vice President of the United States. This followed the controversial regime of 45th president, Donald Trump. “Aso Ebi” is a uniform dress that is traditionally worn in Nigeria during social engagements. It is made from different attires such as Ankara, Lace, Guinea among others. In a video sighted by 9jaonline, the Nigerian mom can be seen dressed in the Aso Ebi material, as she also styled the dress in the African way. Watch the lovely video below; This is not the first time Nigerians will be celebrating with Americans, it happened during the Obama administration.
  6. The newly sworn-in president of the United States of America, Joe Biden, has began to deliver on campaign promises as he canceled Trump’s travel ban on Nigeria, and other countries. Biden began his first day in office by reversing some actions of former President, Donald Trump, as he implemented new policies on the COVID-19 pandemic, immigration and climate change. The 46th American president cancelled the ban which restricted travel to America from mostly Muslim nations. The countries are Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen, Chad, North Korea, Venezuela, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Nigeria, Sudan, and Tanzania. At the Oval Office’s Resolute Desk, Biden rolled out 15 orders and two other action items. Biden has made mask wearing in all federal buildings and during interstate travel mandatory. “It’s requiring, as I said all along, where I have authority, mandating masks be worn, social distancing be kept on federal property,” he told reporters. He also signed orders for America to formally rejoin the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Paris climate agreement.
  7. President Donald Trump has departed the White House by helicopter, on his way to a ceremonial send-off at Joint Base Andrews for his final day in office. Trump told gathered reporters it had been a great honor and an amazing four years. Breaking with decades of tradition, Trump will not participate in the peaceful transition of power and is skipping the inauguration. The outgoing president typically departs shortly after the incoming president is sworn in. But Trump, who fought bitterly to overturn the results of the 2020 election, is skipping President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, instead opting to orchestrate his own fanfare-filled exit while he is still commander-in-chief. Donald Trump also left a note for his successor before he left the Oval Office for the last time, a White House spokesperson for the Trump administration confirmed to the Guardian. The note to incoming president Joe Biden continues a longstanding tradition between successive presidents, even of the opposing parties. The letters are meant to stay private but oftentimes eventually get leaked out to the public. When Barack Obama left office in 2015, he wrote a note for Trump. George W Bush too left a note for Obama in 2009.
  8. US Election day 2020 poll: Republican President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are in a tense race for the White House today, who do you think will come out victorious in this election? What is your opinion on the Us Election results #election2020 and Primary election results? Please kindly comment below to express your opinion:
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